My new photo book is now available for purchase as an ebook on Amazon! Many young children are  fascinated by the opportunity to take machines apart and discover the mysteries inside. I created Take Apart a Clock for a STEM enrichment class I led this winter and spring. The book features the character of the Curious Doll and demonstrates introductory mechanical engineering concepts, such as the real-life applications of gears and screws.

Take Apart a Clock is not a traditional children’s book – It features more than 40 detailed photos of the take-apart process, including the tools and all the various parts found inside. The large number of photos is one reason the book is sold as an ebook rather than a paper book. I recommend that teachers use a Smartboard or screen to project the digital images in the classroom in order to introduce children to future take-apart experiences or as a stand-alone STEM activity.

Some readers of my generation may recognize that the character of the Curious Doll was inspired by Dare Wright’s Lonely Doll photo books published in the 1950s and 1960s. However, my Curious Doll is a true 21st century gal, brave and confident, ready to take on challenging STEM adventures. Her next story? I’m working on a new photo book in which the Curious Doll learns to code!

Here’s the ebook description that appears in the Amazon listing:

Curious about how things work? Take apart a clock!

Join the Curious Doll in her first STEM learning adventure. In this photo story, easy-to-read text and detailed images teach about the inner workings of a simple alarm clock. Discover what makes the clock keep time and ring. Learn tips for how to safely open and take apart a household device using tools like a Phillips screwdriver. Explore the inner circuitry and mechanisms, from the motor to the bells to the tiny jewel-like gears.

The process of taking apart a clock introduces young tinkerers to concepts at the foundation of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). The character of the Curious Doll adds a playful element that makes the story accessible to young children, yet the take-apart process challenges children to think deeply about STEM concepts related to engineering.

 

 

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